14 Comments

  1. Gloria
    March 3, 2011 @ 12:32 pm

    Great tut! I will be using this one very soon. Thank you!!

    Reply

  2. Wanda
    March 31, 2011 @ 12:40 pm

    Thank you Linda for the wonderful lessons, step by step, you’re the man with golden heart !!!!!!!!!

    Reply

  3. Sue Tomasic
    July 19, 2011 @ 4:16 pm

    Okay! Now that I’ve made machine wrapped cording how do I attach it to my quilt?

    Reply

    • Linda Matthews
      July 19, 2011 @ 8:31 pm

      Any way you like! By machine or hand is the most common way.

      Reply

  4. Jude Ongley-Mowris
    July 20, 2011 @ 1:19 pm

    Oh yea! This looks easy! Thank you so much for the tutorial! I am off to twist some really ugly yarn to make something absolutely yummy!
    (hey)Jude

    Reply

  5. Gaile A Heimbuch
    July 27, 2011 @ 2:09 pm

    Hi, love all your tutorials, I have learned so much. Thanks, Gaile

    Reply

  6. Joan
    August 18, 2011 @ 4:58 am

    I’m loving your web pages. Machine wrapped cords are great! I made three today and love the process as well as the result.
    I now have them hanging around my neck! Keep up your work. It is inspiring.
    Best Wishes,
    Joan.

    Reply

  7. Deb Cragan
    September 9, 2011 @ 9:17 am

    Brilliant. i love making my own cords too. I keep all my cottons etc and they go down the middle. I especially like using materials with loose weave as they add exyta dimension to the finished product(my way). But I always wondered how they were really made and its the satin stitch that I was missing out on that gave it the depth I wanted. so thanks for the tutorial.

    Reply

    • Linda Krause
      April 28, 2013 @ 9:01 pm

      Your work is beautiful!
      What is a satin stitch?
      Also, when you use this as edging on your journals, do you have to put binding on the journal first or can you just attach the cording to the raw edge of the journal?

      Reply

      • LindaM
        April 29, 2013 @ 5:49 am

        Hi Linda – satin stitch is a narrow zig-zag stitch and is sometimes used for finishing edges. For these particular journals I don’t bind them, I finish the edges with satin stitch and then attach the cording. You could also attach the cording to raw edges.

        Reply

  8. Chris Gilbert
    February 6, 2012 @ 11:59 am

    I would like to make some cording that shows the “lashes” on eyelash wool. Do you have any ideas please? Thank you for wonderful lesson on cording. Chris

    Reply

    • Linda Matthews
      February 7, 2012 @ 12:50 pm

      The only way to do it by machine is to sew with a longer length stitch and then manually pull out the outlashes.

      Reply

  9. Diane Kelsey
    July 6, 2012 @ 2:07 am

    The boxes are just what I have been working on, I wish I had seen the tutorial several weeks ago. Love the idea of using them for embellishment and with the circular attachment. Thank you for the tutorial..

    Reply

  10. Val
    July 12, 2012 @ 1:59 am

    Thank you for a very well written lesson the images show it all .I have had a play before but it didn’t work as well as your lesson can’t wait to try it
    Val

    Reply

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